Processor Hacked; Bankers, Yet Another Credit Card Data Breach

Robert Siciliano Identity Theft Expert

In the next day you will begin to see lots of chatter through your local association and warnings from government agencies about another huge credit card processor hacked. Who was hacked? They arent saying just yet. How much was hacked? We dont know.

A statement issued by the Community Bankers Association of Illinois states “Visa announced that an unnamed processor recently reported that it discovered a data breach. The processors name has been withheld pending completion of the forensic investigation” The Open Security Foundation posted a notice on its website Here

CBAI report here and highlights below

According to VISA officials, the breach affected all card brands. Evidence indicates that the account number, PAN and expiration dates were stolen. No cardholder Social Security numbers, unencrypted personal identification numbers (PIN), addresses or telephone numbers or other personal information were involved in the breach.

An increase in card-not-present fraud suggests some BIN number have been targeted by criminals.

VISA officials reported that while the number of accountholders affected is undetermined, it appears to be fewer than those affected by the recent Heartland Payment Systems breach, but a significant number nonetheless. And unlike the Heartland breach, where thieves also captured Track 2 data, officials reiterated that no personal information was taken in this most recent event.

The status of the processor’s PCI compliance is unknown at this time. Bankers. MORE TO COME….”

Why not go after processors, thats where all the data is!

Visa and MasterCard are in the process of notifying affected banks about what they say is a “major compromise”. So far this is not related to the Heartland Payment Systems breach where an expected 100 million cards have been compromised. Or it may be, we don’t know.

Initial reports say the criminal hackers planted malware, or malicious software on the processors servers. Malware of this type generally has some type of remote control component that allows a criminal hacker to remotely access the server and divert data underground.

Visa reached out to all affected banks on February 12th when they conducted a conference call disclosing the severity of the issue. Apparently the compromise occurred from February of 2008 till August 2008 the past few weeks.

At this point neither Visa or MasterCard haven’t disclosed which processor has been compromised nor have they disclosed the size of the breach.

Whether the unknown processor was compliant or not has also not been revealed.

Check your credit and banking statements carefully. Scrutinize every charge and refute any unauthorized charges within 30-60 days. Call your bank/credit card company immediately if you see any fraudulent activity.

Robert Siciliano Identity Theft Speaker Expert discussing another ugly data breach Here.

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